Rodgers - Sessions
 
 

Last update 25 Jan 2011

Rodgers, C P (Charles P., Jr?)
Private
Company H

Listed as Private in muster roll of Co. H published by T.J. Carlisle in 1902 WEEKLY ENTERPRISE (Enterprise AL)


Rodgers (Rogers), Charles P, Sr.
Captain
Company D-Field & Staff (Assistant Quatermaster/Regimental Quartermaster)

Served as Regimental Quartermaster, signed many requisitions including: "Requisition for one coffin at Columbus MS dated 25 July 1862 for Pvt F. M. Culpepper of Co. B signed by J O Davis, Lieut/commanding company and C P Rogers/asst quartermaster"; Dropped from rolls 16 Apr 1863 - revoked 4 May 1864: "Not bonded." See Special Order No. 104/13; Present 1 Feb 1864 in Moore's Brigade, Cheatham's Division, Hardee's Corps; Present in Atlanta GA 15 Aug 1864 as member of Clayton's Division, Baker's Brigade, Lee's Corps, Army of Tennessee; POW captured at Lowndes County AL 23 Apr 1865 by 16th Army Corps USA; Note: Letter in his file on microfilm states: "... He is small and weak but a great businessman..."; Mentioned in 29 May 1902 WEEKLY ENTERPRISE (Enterprise AL) article:

"In this week's issue will be found muster roll of Co D... The following are the only names that have been furnished us with postoffice address... Captain C P Rodgers, Letohatchie... you write well; give us a few lines.";

Apparently answered the request as his letter was published in 5 June 1902 edition of WEEKLY ENTERPRISE (Enterprise AL):

"WEEKLY ENTERPRISE PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY By {T.J. Carlisle, G.W. Carlisle THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 1902 - Hon T J Carlisle, Enterprise, Ala.
    My Dear Comrade — I am very much obliged to you for sending me copies of the Weekly Enterprise containing articles relative to the gallant old 37th Alabama Regiment, composed as it was, of the yeomanry of Alabama. It was as fine a regiment as ever formed in line of battle or marched to the tune of Dixie. Out of 1100 men on its muster roll when it was formed, there were only two foreigners — one was a Jew from Henry county I think who soon got a substitute, and the other was a Russian who was our regimental tailor and made a good soldier and was killed at Missionary Ridge. When the 37th Alabama stacked their arms at Bentonville there were 300 men for duty.
    I went to Dallas, Texas, to the re-union, via N O & H R R, and when I stepped aboard the cars at Letohatchie I was agreeably surprised to meet — Blackman, John Moore, J C Watkins and M W Carroll, of Co K, from Troy, Ala. They were all comrades, looked well and filled the bill of lading 'because they were in good order and well conditioned.' I had not seen them since they were at Spanish Fort, and on our way to Mobile I could see the old Fort across the bay and I thought of the grand times the boys had there, how I used to let them have the boats to go fishing and how they always remembered me with the fish, and do you remember how the boys shook with the chills? Why, if I could have got them all together at the same time on one hill, I could have had a very respectable earthquake.
    The Texans did themselves proud at the re-union at Dallas, and the Alabams received a fine ovation in the parade as our Sponsors and Maids of Honor passed in the procession the crowds would yell 'What the matter with Alabama?' 'O, she is alright,' 'Three cheers for Alabama,' which was taken up and continued all along the line of march.
    I met Moore of Co I, and Dave Spence of Co I, both being in Texas. Who does not remember genial Dave Spence of the adjutant’s office who was always ready to do a favor? They answered my questions just like many persons write their letters — 'I am well and doing well and hope these few lines will find you enjoying same blessings.'
    From Dallas I went to Austin—the capitol of the State—to see the finest building south of Washington. There were half a dozen in my party and when I registered at the hotel, the clerk seeing that we were from Alabama said that his father was a confederate solider from Greenville, Ala, and his name was Penn Bedell. I said I knew your father and grandfather, and perhaps many who read these lines will remember them.
    When we entered the capitol the Governor’s Private Secretary seeing that we were confederate veterans invited us into the Executive chamber to see the Governor, who received us with great courtesy and said that although it was Sunday and the elevators were not running, yet we should have the opportunity of seeing the building and ordered the janitor to show us any portion of the building that we desired.
    On the walls of the Senate Chamber and House of Representatives were full length portraits of Mirabeau, Lamar, Fannier, Travis, Williamson, Bowie and others from Georgia, and Alabama, who had given their lives and fortunes for Texas. Rev A T Lamar, whom all Methodists of Alabama delight to honor, is a relative of his and comes from Lowdnes and Williamson was from Lowdnes, Bowie’s relatives live here, and Travis, from Conecuh county. I could have pointed out each one of those heroes on the walls by the strong family resemblance of their kinsmen in Alabama bore to them.
    Georgia and Alabama have made an indelible impress on Texas. Everywhere I went I found people from Alabama, especially from my own county of Lownes and I wondered how any body could be left at home.
    From Austin we went to San Antonio—the largest city of Texas where the U S Government has spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on the military port established there. We visited the celebrated old Spanish Mission church, the 'Alamo,' where Crocket and Bowie and others made their heroic defense and died for Texas. 'Thermopyle had her messenger, the Alamo had none.'
    We visited San Pedro Springs the famous park of San Antonio, and while viewing the grounds the mayor of the city seeing our badges came up and introduced himself and welcomed us to San Antonio—in fact, wherever we went in Texas from the Governor down to the private citizens, they did the proper things to the old Vets.
    San Antonia has three distinct nationalities inhabiting her confines, viz: the American, the German and the Mexican, all these differ in language, custom and religion. It is a great resort for consumption with its clear dry atmosphere 690 feet above the level of the sea and only 100 miles from the Gulf. The annual rainfall is only 29 inches, whilst the annual rainfall in Alabama is 60 inches. The country around San Antonio looked to me like a desert and I thought I had got to the end of the world, so I turned my footsteps eastward where all the wise men came from (and I staid there) as I was convinced by every foot I went westward.
    From San Antonia we went to Houston and Galveston and I was much pleased to mark the rapid recuperation of that ill-fated city by the sea. In my judgement it is destined to become the greatest city of Texas, the grand emporium of the State; every grand trunk line west of the Mississippi has Galveston as its objective point, because it has 28 feet of water over its bay. A stranger would never know that there had been a flood at Galveston. I went to the eastern portion of the city when the breakers were rolling in from the Gulf. I asked a fisherman to show me some evidences of the flood; said he: 'You see those breakers a quarter of a mile away? That was a part of the city, now the fishes swim over it. At your very feet are two graves by the water’s edge; don’t you see the crosses over them?' I looked down and there were two silent unknown graves  and the wild wave sang their requiem.
    I walked sadly away from the spot and prepared to return to the city. Whilst waiting for the street cars a young lady seeing our badges said to us, 'Gentlemen, I see that you are confederate veterans. My father was a soldier and my grandfather was a soldier and fought for Texas I would like to shake each of you by the hand. I have been reading the papers about the old veterans of Dallas and the pathetic scenes there and I could not help from crying.'
    I said, 'Madam, do not shed any tears for us. We came out with whole bones and empty haversacks and we did well. What is your son’s name, and that is a beautiful dog you have, what is his name?' 'Oh his name is ‘Flood’; he came to us after the storm, He lost all his folks and I thought of those two lonely graves by the sea and thought that if ‘Flood’ could talk he could tell me something about them.'
    I was invited to inspect the plans for the erection of a sea wall around Galveston on exhibition at the rooms of the board of trade. These works will cost $8,500,000 and will be three and one-half miles long. I gave them my unqualified approval and told them to go ahead, if New Orleans can afford to spend ninety millions for drainage Galveston can well afford to spend there and a half millions to secure success. There were kickers in Galveston like there are everywhere when the bold and energetic citizens try to improve their surroundings. We have them here in Lowdnes. When success shall crown Galveston’s efforts then some devils will have the assurance to come forward and claim all the credit and say 'Oh we did it— we are the whole thin.'
     Texas is a great State, but is an empire of great changes and vicissitudes. Think of a man driving a yoke of oxen—the heat is so overpowering that the ox gives up the ghost, the man gets down to skin him and before he gets thro’ a norther comes along and the other ox freezes to death. This has happened. The man who would leave Alabama to farm in Texas where in some parts they have to haul water and wood seven miles every week, ought to have a guardian appointed for him.
    Land is worth $40 per acre. The whole country is under wire fence, and a man has to make a slave of his wife on account of the scarcity of labor and woman’s work is never done. I never shook hands with a Texas lady but what I observed that her hands were rougher and tougher than mine!!
    Coffee county with its salubrious climate, cheap lands, 60 inches of annual rainfall, perennial streams of pure delicious water, plenty of wood orchards and gardens, ought to make the man who left coffee say as he turns his face to the east, 'Oh Lord, just let me go to Coffee when I die. Amen.'
    C P Rodgers, Sr.
    Letohatchee, Ala."

Charles P. Rogers Sr. born 8 Aug 1832 - died 20 Oct 1922 buried Rogers Family Cem., Letohatchee, Lowndes Co., AL; His death noted in Confederate Veteran Magazine (1923) with this entry: "Charles P. Rogers Capt. Co. F 37th Alabama Inf. b/ 8 Aug. 1832 d/ 20 Oct. 1922, Member of the Lomax Camp of United Confederate Veterans, Montgomery Alabama"

POSSIBLY SAME MAN AS PRIVATE C P RODGERS (Junior?) OF COMPANY H, BUT UNLIKELY DUE TO RANK AND OTHER FACTORS


Rodgers (Rogers), Daniel
Private
Company C

Age at Enlistment: 30
Enlisted 24 March 1862 at Leon AL; WIA or sick at Vicksburg MS as he signed his parole there on 13 July 1863 with X in the City Hospital as a Private of Co. C of the 37th AL Infantry CSA; Among sick and wounded POWs delivered at Fort Morgan AL (mouth of Mobile Bay) 5 Aug 1863 aboard steamer St Maurcie from Vicksburg MS via New Orleans LA; Signed his parole at Montgomery AL 7 June 1865 with X; 6’1" tall with light hair, blue eyes and fair complexion

Rogers, Daniel B (D O)
Private
Company G

Enlisted 17 March 1862 in Co. B of 42nd AL CSA; Paroled in the field at Vicksburg MS as a Private of Co. B of the 42nd AL CSA; paroled at Greensboro NC 1 May 1865 as part of CONSOLIDATED 37th AL CSA Co. G

Rogers, J A
Private
Company K

Enlisted (Conscripted?) 21 March 1864; Hospitalized in Ross Hospital at Mobile AL 28 Sep-6 Oct 1864 with Febris Intermittens, Quot. (malaria); Paroled at Greensboro NC 1 May 1865 as part of CONSOLIDATED 37th AL CSA Co. K; Signed second parole with X  at Salisbury NC 31 May 1865 (likely hospitalized there); Buried in Goodwater Freewill Baptist Church Cem., Houston Co., AL

Rogers, Jasper
Private
Company F

Signed his parole at Vicksburg MS on 10 July 1863

Rogers, Jesse T
Private
Company G

Enlisted 1 Sep 1862 in Co. B of 42nd AL CSA at Columbus MS; Paroled in the field at Vicksburg MS as a Private of Co. B of the 42nd AL CSA; Paroled at Greensboro NC 1 May 1865 as part of CONSOLIDATED 37th AL CSA Co. G

Roland, Ezekiel
Private
Company F

Buried at Oakland Cem., Atlanta, Fulton Co., GA

Roman, Theo
Private
Company B

Appears on undated roll of Co. B in Tallapoosa Co AL Archives

Roney (Rooney), James
Private
Company H

Enlisted 5 May 1862 in Co. I of 42nd AL CSA; Paroled in the field at Vicksburg MS as a Private of Co. I of the 42nd AL CSA; Paroled at Greensboro NC 1 May 1865 as part of CONSOLIDATED 37th AL CSA Co. H

Rossmann (Rosmann), Theo J
Private
Company B

POW at Lookout Mountain TN on 24 Nov 1863 "Captured In Arms by General Thomas’ troops." Presumably sent to Nashville TN, Louisville KY and on to Rock Island Prison IL - APPEARS TO BE SAME MAN AS "THEODORE G/J BOZEMAN/BUSSMAN" ALSO COMPANY B AS NO OTHER RECORDS FOR THIS NAME FOUND

Rowden (Routon), J M
Private
Company K

Mentioned as having "died; don’t know where" in 1902 letter of A.J. Bryan (Co. K) published in 1902 WEEKLY ENTERPRISE (Enterprise AL)

Rudder, Jonathan M
2nd Lieutenant-1st Lieutenant
Company F

Served previously in both 54th AL and 22nd AL; paroled at Greensboro NC 1 May 1865 as part of CONSOLIDATED 37th AL CSA Co. F as 2nd Lt; Buried at Shubuta Cem., Clarke Co., MS

Ruffin, Samuel
Rank Unknown
Company F

Died in service of unknown cause 6 Dec 1862 and buried at Canton Cem., Canton MS
 
Rundell, Horace W
Private
Company D

Age at Enlistment: 23
Enlisted 23 April 1862; Appears on Muster Roll of Co. D dated 13 May 1862 at Auburn AL; Listed as Private in muster roll of Co. D published by T.J. Carlisle in 1902 WEEKLY ENTERPRISE (Enterprise AL)

Rutledge, John Thomas
Private
Company G

Age at Enlistment: 29
Enlisted 24 March 1862 at Auburn AL; Census 1860: Chambers County AL / Farmer / 1 slave / house 204; Born 24 Aug 1832 at Oglethorpe County GA; Died 17 Jan 1912 at LaGrange, Troupe County GA; Burial Jan 1912 Hillview Cemetery, Sec 3, lot 171 at LaGrange GA; Cause of death "Pneumonia"; Belonged to Masonic Lodge for 59 years; Pension application states: "has resided in Troupe Co. since 1882"; Occupation: "School teacher, mechanic and farmer"; Buried in Hillview Cem., LaGrange GA

Sadler, Frank
Private
Company G

WIA or sick at Vicksburg MS as he is paroled (July-Aug 1863) while Hospitalized there as a Private of Co. G of the 37th AL Infantry CSA

Sadler, George  Washington ("Old Man Sadler")
Private
Company G

Age at Enlistment: 54
Served as substitute for Robert L. Mitchell; Died in service and claim for deceased soldier filed 30 March 1863 by Sarah Sadler; Died of "Smallpox" at Smallpox Camp along the Tallahachie River MS during the fall-winter of 1862; Father of Thomas Sadler (Co. G)


Sadler, Thomas ("Tom")
Private
Company G

Survived Smallpox at Smallpox Camp along Tallahatchie River MS (fall-winter 1862); Son of George Sadler (Co. G); WIA (head wound) during siege at Vicksburg MS and signed his parole there with X on 16 July 1863 in General Hospital No. 2; The circumstances of his wound were recalled in the memoirs of eyewitness S.L. Burney (Co. G) circa 1916:

"...We had blankets or coverlets stretched over the ditches to keep the sun off. We did this by sticking a bayonet through two corners and caught the other two under the hammers which gave ample shade for two men. The man under the shade with me was named Tom Sadler. He was just about my age. The shade becoming sagged, he got up to adjust it and in doing so raised his head slightly above the works. A sharpshooter from the enemy’s trenches caught him in a jiffy, hitting him on the left jaw. Owing to the dip of his head to one side, only one jaw was broken. This wound, I am told has never healed entirely yet...";

Listed among 611 sick and wounded POWs aboard S.S. Crescent arriving at Mobile Harbor 4 Aug 1863 "Lt. Winslow delivered 611 prisoners on board the Crescent. Received by 2nd Lt. O.C. Donoho CSA"; Hospitalized in Ross Hospital at Mobile AL 14-26 Feb 1864 with Febris Intermittent, Tert. (malaria)



Samford (Sanford/Sanfold), Thomas L
Private-Sergeant Major-Adjutant
Regimental Field & Staff

Enlisted 10 Apr 1862 at Lafayette AL; Previously served for 12 months with 7th AL Infantry Regiment CSA; Paid $100 2 March 1863 for Feb 1863; Signed his parole in the field at Vicksburg on 9 July 1863 as Adjutant of the 37th AL Infantry CSA; Signed for feed for 1 horse on 31 Dec 1863; Leave of Absence S.O. No. 45/3 dated 14 Feb 1864; Report at Dog River Factory near Mobile AL dated 31 Dec 1864 says he was Adjutant from 1 Dec 1862; From Macon County; Mentioned by T.J. Carlisle, "37th Alabama Survivors" editorial WEEKLY ENTERPRISE, 10 Apr 1902 as "Adj T L Samford died about two years since at Loachapoka, Ala."; Mentioned in "Formation of Company I" article of WEEKLY ENTERPRISE of unknown date "... On the 10th of May [1862] orders to organize a regiment were received... In a few days the following regimental staff was announced: ... T L Samford - Sergt Major ..."; Appears on Muster Roll of "Company ’I’ 37th Regiment, Alabama Volunteers at LaFayette, Chambers County, Alabama, March 6, 1862" published in 31 July 1901 issue of LAFAYETTE SUN n (LaFayette, Chambers Co AL) with Privates as "Samford, Thos. L., appointed Adjutant, Dec. 1862"


Sanders, John Randolf
Brevet 2nd Lieutenant-2nd Lieutenant
Company K

Age at Enlistment: 27
"John R Sanders" enlisted 17 March 1862; Dr. Culver signed an extension of leave 23 Aug 1862 for 30 days "… not over the measles.", originally granted leave by Special Order No. 9 dated 9 Aug 1862; Resigned 10 March 1863 effective 25 July 1862; Likely "John Randolf Sanders" a brother-in-Law to AJ and WW Bryan (both Co. K), born 25 Apr 1835 and died 25 Oct 1914; Married Mellison Bryan; Buried at Hopewell Primitive Baptist Church, near Henderson, Pike Co, AL


Sanders, Martin
Private-Sergeant
Company K

Enlisted 17 March 1862; POW at Iuka-Corinth-Hatchie MS on Oct 1862 report as POW sent by Provost Marshall at Holly Springs MS en route to Cairo IL and exchanged 9 Oct 1862 aboard steamer Louis D’Or near Baton Rouge LA; POW again at Water Valley MS on 3 Dec 1862 and exchanged 4 Apr 1863; Sent from Alton Military Prison IL for exchange 1 Apr 1863; One of 855 POWs to arrive at City Point VA on 8 Apr 1863; One of the medical staff at Greensboro NC in Shelly’s Brigade, Loring’s Division; Transferred 11 Apr 1865 to Pettigrew General Hospital No. 13 at Raleigh NC; Paroled at Greensboro NC 1 May 1865 Hospital as part of CONSOLIDATED 37th AL CSA Co. K as Sergeant; Mentioned as "lost; don’t know where" in 1902 letter of A.J. Bryan (Co. K) published in WEEKLY ENTERPRISE


Saunders (Sanders), James Madison Dr.
Private-Sergeant
Company A

Age at Enlistment: 35
Enlisted 22 March 1862 at Auburn AL by J.F. Dowdell; Listed as Private on Muster Roll of Co. A dated 13 May 1862 at Auburn AL; Mentioned by Samuel Singletary in his description of the organization of Co. A published in 17 Apr 1902 edition of The Weekly Enterprise (Enterprise, Chambers County, Ala.):

"Early in the second week of March 1862, Moses B Green, W E Bradley, Robert L Phipps, J V Perryman and Dr James M Saunders began to enlist men for the company. Green and Bradley worked in Abbeville and west into Dale county getting the larger part of men in that locality. Phipps and Perryman recruited in the eastern portion of the county and Dr James Saunders and Thomas Armstrong worked in the lower end of the county, getting the second largest batch of recruits."

Testified as a physician in the Court Martial of Alonzo Wood (Co. B) held 31 June 1862 at Columbus, Miss., (an ill Pvt. Wood had fallen asleep on guard duty) – an excerpt from the transcript showing Dr. Saunders' testimony follows (the court ruled in Wood's favor):

"... THE JUDGE ADVOCATE THEN INTRODUCED SERGEANT JAMES M. SANDERS CO. A, 37th ALA. WHO AFTER BEING DULY SWORN TESTIFIED AS FOLLOWS:

QUESTION: Do you know the defendant {?}

(SAUNDERS): I do.

QUESTION: Do you know whether or not the defendant was regularly detailed from Co. A for guard duty on the 18th of June, 1862 {?}
(SAUNDERS): The orderly Sergeant told me that he was, and asked me if he was able to do duty. I told him that he had fever on him at the time and was not, and I am pretty certain this was the 18th of June.

CROSS {Cross Examination}
QUESTION: Was he able to do duty at that time {?}
(SAUNDERS): I give it as my testimony being his physician that he was not.

QUESTION: How many days has he been imprisioned (by a member of the court) {?}
(SAUNDERS): Twelve days ..."

SEE INDIVIDUAL RECORDS OF LT COL ALEXANDER A. GREENE, CAPT MARION C.J. SEARCY, PVT GILES W. RICHARDS AND PVT ALONZO B. WOOD FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND THEIR TESTIMONY OFFERED DURING THESE COURT MARTIAL PROCEEDINGS
;

According to Civil War physician authority, Dr. Terry Hambrecht, Dr. James Madison Saunders was born 26 Dec 1826 at Oglethorpe, Georgia, and was practicing medicine there in 1850; Married Saphronia Josephine Bush 29 Oct 1851 at Oglethorpe, Ga.; Received his M.D. from The Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, Ga., in 1852; By 1860 was in the practice of medicine at Rowville, Henry County, Ala., and by 1880 had removed to what was then Jackson County, Ga.; Noted in 1886, 1890 and 1893 in medical practice at Jug Tavern, Ga., (by 1900, the place was renamed Winder); Widowed and living on his own income in 1910 at Winder (then-Jackson County, Ga.); Died 26 Sept 1915 at Winder, (now-Barrow County, Ga.), of nephritis and buried there in Rose Hill Cemetery in the Saunders family plot; Learn about those who dedicated themselves to care for the sick and wounded throughout the war at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine;


Saunders (Sanders), Robert G
Private
Company A

Age at Enlistment: 19
Enlisted 30 Apr 1862 at Auburn AL by J.F. Dowdell; Listed as Private on Muster Roll of Co. A dated 13 May 1862 at Auburn AL; Signed his parole in the field at Vicksburg MS on 9 July 1863 as a Private of Co.y A of the 37th AL Infantry CSA; Still in service 22 June 1864


Saunders (Sanders), William E
5th Sergeant
Company A

Age at Enlistment: 28
Enlisted 22 March 1862 at Auburn AL by J.F. Dowdell; Listed as 5th Sergeant on Muster Roll of Co. A dated 13 May 1862 at Auburn AL; Signed his parole in the field at Vicksburg MS on 9 July 1863 as a Sergeant of the Co. A of the 37th AL Infantry CSA; Served as mechanic for Oct and Nov 1863 and paid 25 cents per day extra duty; Still in service 25 June 1864; Mentioned by Samuel Singletary in his description of the organization of Co. A published in 17 Apr 1902 edition of WEEKLY ENTERPRISE (enterprise AL): "... This completed the organization of the company except the appointment of non-commissioned officers, which the captain did soon after our arrival at Auburn which was as follows: ... W E Saunders, 5th Sergt ..."; Born 5 Oct 1822 - Died 10 Aug 1906, Buried in Old Lineville City Cem., Lineville, Clay Co., AL


Sanderson, E L
Private
Company D

Signed his parole at Montgomery AL on 9 May 1865


Sawell (Sowell) (Sewell?), T C (T S)
Sergeant
Company A

Paroled at Greensboro NC on 3 May 1865 as part of CONSOLIDATED 37th AL CSA Co. A


Scarbrough, James W
2nd Lieutenat-1st Lieutenant
Company F

Previously served in Co. I of the 15th AL Infantry CSA in which he had enlisted as Private and had been WIA in Battle of 1st Cold Harbor; Transferred to Co. F of 37th AL Infantry CSA on 1 March 1863; Signed his parole at Vicksburg MS on 10 July 1863; Hospitalized in Columbus Hospital (Columbus GA?) 28 Feb 1864 and transferred to Montgomery Hospital on 1 March 1864; Hospitalized 20 Aug 1864 near Atlanta GA; Paroled at Montgomery AL 26 May 1865 in Clayton’s Division, Lee’s Corps, Baker’s Brigade; 6’0" tall with dark hair, dark eyes and dark complexion; Signed pay vouchers and requisitions; Occupation: "Sheriff"; Witnessed the Confederate Pension application of J.N. Browder (Co. F)


Schuessler, Lewis S
Rank Unknown
Company I

Died 1937 and buried at Lafayette AL
 
Scott, Benjamin Summerfield (F)
1st Lieutenant
Company F

Age at Enlistment: 31/36
Enlisted 12 March 1862 at Pike County AL; POW at Iuka MS 18-19 Sep 1862 on list of those in Martin’s Brigade, Little’s Division forwarded to Columbus KY by Provost Marshall at Corinth MS dated 25 Sep 1862; Died in service and reported "Dead" at Cairo IL by USA Depot General Hospital at Cairo IL on report of 1 Oct 1862 having died there on 22 Oct 1862 of "Febris Typhoides" (Typhoid fever); 5’10" tall with blue eyes, dark hair and dark complexion and farmer by occupation; Age at enlistment is shown as "31" and also "36" on different records; Apparently referred to in the personal papers of Moses B. Green, Company A 37th Alabama Infantry Regiment (further research needed to locate papers); Listed on Muster Roll of Co. F published in 1902 WEEKLY ENTERPRISE (Enterprise AL) as "B S Scott, 1st Lieut"; Age given as "33" in 1860 Census; Son of Benjamin Carter Scott

Seaborn(e) (Seaborns), William M
Private
Company H

Age at Enlistment: ca 35
Enlisted 18 March 1862 at Lawrenceville AL; Signed his parole at Vicksburg MS on 10 July 1863 with X; Paid $22 on 6 Feb 1864 for Nov and Dec 1863; Hospitalized in Ross Hospital at Mobile AL18-28 Nov 1864 with Febris Intermittens, Quot. (malaria); Born 28 Jan 1827 - Died 28 Jan 1892 according to marker for "William M Seaborn, Pvt., Co H, 37th Ala." located in Belcher Bethel Church Cemetery (off State Road 131) southwest of Baker Hill AL

Seagraves, B F
Private
Company F

Age at Enlistment: 24
Enlisted 12 March 1862 at Pike County AL; Died in service 17 Aug 1862 at Columbus MS of pneumonia; Claim for deceased solider filed 28 Aug 1863 by Permilia Seagrave, widow


Seagraves, Henry C
(sic Scograves)
Private
Company I

Enlisted 25 Apr 1862 at Lafayette AL; POW at Iuka MS 18-19 Sep 1862 and paroled; Signed his parole in the field at Vicksburg MS on 9 July 1863 as a Private of Co. I of the 37th AL Infantry CSA; Hospitalized in Ladies’ Hospital at Montgomery AL 15 Nov 1864; Appears on Muster Roll of "Company ’I’ 37th Regiment, Alabama Volunteers at LaFayette, Chambers County, Alabama, March 6, 1862" published in 31 July 1901 issue of LAFAYETTE SUN (LaFayette, Chambers Co AL) with Privates as "Seagraves, Henry C."

Seal, H M
Private
Company K

Paroled at Talladega AL 23 May 1865 by General Chrysler’s troops


Searcy, James K. P.
Private
Company H

Enlisted 18 March 1862 at Lawrenceville AL; Signed his parole at Vicksburg MS on 10 July 1863


Searcy, Lemuel (Limuel) D
Private
Company H

Enlisted 18 March 1862 at Lawrenceville AL


Searcy, Marion C. J. (sic Marvin)
Captain
Company H

Enlisted 18 March 1862 at Lawrenceville AL; Preferred charges against Private Alonzo Wood (Co. B) at Columbus MS 18 June 1862 for sleeping on guard duty:

"... CHARGE VS ALONZA {sic Alonzo} WOOD / Charge / Violation of the 46th article of war. Specification is this, that Alonza Wood did, on the night of the 18th of Jun., 1862, go to sleep on post at Bluct’s {read Bluett’s} Bridge when placed there as a sentinal. (Signed) Marion Searcy / Officer of the day..."

Transcript of Searcy’s testimony during Wood's Court Martial:

"... The Judge Advocate then questioned Capt. Marion Searcy- who testifies as follows -
QUESTION...... Do you know the defendant (Alonza Wood) {?}
ANSWER......... I know him when I see him
QUESTION...... Did you see him on or about the 18th of June, if so, state where did you see him and all that took place on that occasion concerning with defendant
ANSWER......... I saw the prisoner on the 18th of June on his post as sentinal {sic}, at the far end of Bluct’s (read Bluett’s) Bridge. I had occasion to cross the bridge and found the sentinal and supposed him to be asleep. He was sitting in a leaning posture against the bridge. I didn’t stop to wake him up - supposed him to be asleep. I had a candle with me, the defendant didn’t halt me as I passed over first, as I returned he halted me. The strongest reason that I had that Defendant was asleep was that there was an order issued that day that no sentinal was to sit on his post. The strongest reason that I had that defendant was asleep was that he was still and noiseless. There were three of us walking together over the bridge making the usual noise that is made by that many persons walking over a plank bridge. It was a regular guard post and sentinal was placed there by my order as officer of the day.
-CROSS {Cross Examination}-
QUESTION...... Did you speak to him or those with you at the time of your first passing over the bridge, did you and those with you not move as noiselessly as possible. Under the duty isn’t it upon you to visit sentinals to ascertain what was the real manner in which they were discharging their duties.
ANSWER......... None of us spoke to him. No sir, I walked as I commonly walk and I suppose those who were with me did the same thing.
QUESTION...... Was the defendant a raw recruit
ANSWER......... He was
QUESTION...... Was not your office that night as much to instruct the sentinals as well as to ascertain their fault and did you instruct him and drill him in his duties {?}
ANSWER......... It was my duty to instruct the sentinals as well as to see that they did their duty, I did not say a word to him when I passed him either time.
QUESTION...... Is the defendant not a mere lad under 18 years of of age - look at him and tell
ANSWER........ I suppose him to be under 18 years of age
QUESTION..... Do you know the young man’s character in the company or regiment to which he belongs for subordination and fidelity as a soldier {?}
ANSWER........ His officers say he discharges all his duties faithfully as well or better than any man in the company
QUESTION..... Don’t you know, if so, state whether this young man had not been very sick with measles or something else just before that time and was not able to perform sentinal duty at night. What hour of the night did his relief come on and when was he relieved.
ANSWER........ I do not know of it of my knowledge. His relief came on the hour of 10 o’clock at night and was taken off at 12 o’clock. ..."; -- (SEE INDIVIDUAL SERVICE RECORDS OF LT COL ALEXANDER A. GREENE, PVT GILES W. RICHARDS, SGT JAMES M. SANDERS AND PVT ALONZO B. WOOD FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON COURT MARTIAL PROCEEDINGS;

Searcy was present at his post in Columbus MS July 1862; WIA at Corinth MS 3-5 Oct 1862; Signed his parole at Vicksburg MS on 10 July 1863; WIA at Missionary Ridge TN on 25 (Lookout Mountain also cited on 24) Nov 1863; Died in service 9 Dec 1863 of a seemingly minor wound while recuperating in the Hospital, the wound, above the elbow, became gangrenous and his arm was amputated at the shoulder resulting in his death; Succeeded by T.B. Richards as Captain; sic as "Marvin" C J Searcy" listed as "Captain" by Brewer, War of the Rebellion"


Seats , Stephen J
(sic Sears)
Private
Company B

Enlisted 15 March 1862 at Daviston AL; POW at Iuka-Corinth-Hatchie sent to Columbus KY from Corinth MS on 9 Oct 1862 and one of 539 POWs exchanged near Vicksburg MS aboard steamer Dacotah on 18 Oct 1862; KIA at Vicksburg MS 10 June 1863; Buried in grave no. 11 of Soldiers Rest plot of Cedar Hill (City) Cemetery, Vicksburg MS; Claim for deceased soldier filed 15 Apr 1864 by Sarah J. Seats, widow; Family source states he is a son of "Shugus" Seats and Sarah Gibbons of Chambers/Tallapoosa County Alabama, a brother, John G Seats also reportedly MIA with 14th Alabama Infantry Co E on 30 June 1862

Sellers, James Monroe
Private
Company B

Age at Enlistment: abt 18
Enlisted 15 March 1862 at Daviston AL; Signed his parole at Vicksburg MS with X; Brother-in-law to James Lorenzo Thompson (Co. B) e.g. married Catherine Thompson; A "J.M. Sellers" swore an affidavit as a witness to the service of H.T. Bishop of Co. B dated 7 July 1904 for Bishop’s Confederate Pension Application; Witnessed the Confederate Pension application of Archibald Jennings (Co. B); Born 5 Apr 1844 at Henry County GA and died 30 May 1925 at Sylacauga AL; Buried at Old Field Methodist Church cemetery at Sylacauga AL

Sellers (Sellars), James R. E.
Private
Company E & A

Age at Enlistment: 21
Enlisted 8 Apr 1862 at Woodville AL; POW at Taylor’s Station MS on 3 (also 10) Dec 1862 and sent for exchange to Holly Springs MS on 22 Dec 1862; Sent to Alton Military Prison at Alton IL on 10 Jan 1863 and exchanged on 1 Apr 1863; One of 855 POWs exchanged at City Point VA; Hospitalized in 2nd NC Hospital at Petersburg VA 23 Apr 1863; Hospitalized in Floyd House at Macon GA 25 Nov 1863 with "Debilitas" (chronic wasting); Still in service on 22 June 1864


Sessions, Christoper Columbus C.
(C. C. C. / "Chris")
Private
Company B

Age at Enlistment: 25
Enlisted 15 March 1862 at Daviston AL (also 8 May 1862 at Camp Johnson); Signed his parole at Vicksburg MS on 9 July 1863; Wrote the following letter from northern Georgia back home to his sister Elizabeth:

"Dalton GA, Feb 28th, 1864.
Miss E. N. Sessions.
Dear Sister, I am once more permitted to you a few lines wich will inform you that I am well. I hope those few lines will come safe to hand & find you with the remaining part of the family well. Well I suppose you have herd of the Yankees advancing on us here. We was marched out a Tuesday last & lay in line of battle untill this morning we was marched back to our same camp we left. I thought they was going to make a heavy attact here but they found we was strong & had a good position & they left.

(page 2) And it was well for them for we would of give them fits shore. We had about 16 or 18 thousand & they had about 15 or 20 thousand. All they fighting was done was jest skermish fighting. I suppose we killed 40 or 50 and taken about the same prisners. They killed and wounded some of our men but ni so many. I was out on skirmish 24 hours but I was in reserve and didn’t git to fight much. I shot 7 rounds at them. I stood behind a little Beach (read "beech tree"). The balls sized around very close. The closest they shot to me the cut a leaf off of a lime about 3 feet from me jist as I stept out to shoot. A Friday night they took a flight & left so yesterday we fallered them up

(page 3) to Tunnell hill wich was 3 miles & found they was too fur a head & we turned back. So I don’t care if they never stop but if they ever come back they will have to fight shore. Well I must say the 37th got to run the Yanks once. I believe I have give you the substance of there attact here. I received your letter that was dated the 12 inst the day before we went in to line of battle but did not have the chance to answered it be fore. I received one from Willis the same time. They are all the letters I have got by mail since I left home. Willis complined a bout my not writing to him. You can tell him I had rote 2 letters to him

(page 4) and am going rite him another this evening and I have rote a bout 20 to Tom but gits none, but I don’t think hard for I believe you all rite and if you don’t I don’t think hard. I want you all to rite & give me all the news & if Tom is coming out here to see me, I want him to come now. The boys from our settlement is all well. If you here any more from Ike, rite to me where he is. I would like to have some summer pants but don’t put your self to too much trubble a bout them. So I will close rite soon an fail not give all my love

Your brother till death
C.C.C. Sessions
to E. N. Sessions.
(top margin of page 2) Tell all the girls I have rote to them & I aint going to rite no more if they don’t.

(top margin of page 4) I drew $33.75 cts for my commatations rashings (read "rations") while I was at home on furlough."

From Troup County GA; Brother to Willis Daniel Sessions (Co. B); Uncle to William P. East (Co. B)


Sessions, Frederick ("Fred") L
Private
Company I

WIA in GA at unknown place and date and died June 1864 in service from wounds in Gilmer Hospital at Marietta GA 13 or 15 June 1864 (FURTHER RESEARCH NEEDED to see personal papers of Willis Hunter, Pvt, Co F 1st Regiment of Mississippi Cavalry); Claim for deceased soldier filed 31 Oct 1864 by Louisa Sessions, widow; Appears on Muster Roll of "Company ’I’ 37th Regiment, Alabama Volunteers at LaFayette, Chambers County, Alabama, March 6, 1862" published in 31 July 1901 issue of LAFAYETTE SUN (LaFayette, Chambers County AL) with Privates as "Sessions, Frederick, died from wounds June 1864"; Buried at Oakland Cem., Atlanta, Fulton Co., GA


Sessions, Isaac (J) W
Sergeant
Company F

Enlisted 12 March 1862 at Pickens AL; WIA seriously at Iuka MS 19 Sep 1862; WIA or sick as he signed his parole at Vicksburg MS on 16 July 1863 in General Hospital No. 2 as a Sergeant of Co. F of the 37th AL Infantry CSA; Unfit for field service 27 March 1864 by S.O. 15/7 and assigned duty at Military Prison at Atlanta GA as guard during May and June 1864; POW at Macon GA 20 Apr 1865 captured by USA 1st Brigade, 2nd Cavalry Division - POSSIBLY THE "IKE" MENTIONED IN THE LETTER OF C.C.C. SESSIONS DATED 28 FEB 1864 AT DALTON GA


Sessions, Jasper
Private
Company F

Age at Enlistment: 28
Enlisted 12 March 1862 at Pike County AL; Signed his parole at Vicksburg MS on 9 July 1863; Hospitalized in Floyd House at Macon GA 17 June 1864 with gunshot wound to two fingers of the left hand requiring amputation of one damaged finger

Sessions, John
Private
Company I

Enlisted 26 March 1862 at Lafayette AL

Sessions, William Harry (A)
("Billy")
Private
Company F

Age at Enlistment: 36
Enlisted 12 March 1862 at Pike County AL; Served as Nurse in General Hospital at Enterprise MS for Dec 1862; Died in service at Vicksburg MS during the siege from starvation/dysentery - News of his death was brought back to his family by his brother-in-law, Benjamin F. Norsworthy (Co. F)

Sessions, Willis Daniel
(sic William)
Private
Company B

Age at Enlistment: 35
Enlisted 8 May 1862 at Camp Johnson by Capt. Hamner "for three years or the war"; Appears on Company Muster Roll for Capt. Hamner’s Alabama Volunteers dated 15 March 1862 at Daviston AL; Appears on Muster Roll of Company B of 37th AL CSA dated 13 May 1862 at Auburn AL; Appears on a Receipt Roll for clothing dated 18 Dec 1862 noted as witnessed by H.O. Caulkins; Appears on a Receipt Roll for clothing dated 14 April 1864; Appears on undated report of Greenville AL Hospital and noted as "admitted since last Report" apparently in 1864 as it is reported by The Army Argus and Crisis, Mobile, Ala. Nov. 26, 1864 (weekly hospital report); from Troup County GA; Brother of Christopher Columbus C. Sessions (Co. B) and mentioned in his 1864 letter to their sister Elizabeth; Uncle to William P. East (Co. B)

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37th Alabama Regiment of Volunteer Infantry CSA
2300 Cottondale Lane Little Rock, AR 72202
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