Sewell - Skipper
 
 

Last update 21 Feb 2011


Sewell (Sowell/Sawell?), Uriah
Private
Company A

Enlisted 22 March 1862 at Auburn AL; Disability discharge 26 July 1862 at Columbus MS, unfit for duty for 40 days: "Chronic enlargement of liver and dyspepsia. He cannot be cured."; 5’4" tall with fresh complexion, blue eyes, light hair and carpenter by occupation


Sexton, George Washington
Private
Company H

Enlisted 18 March 1862 at Lawrenceville AL in “Captain Searcy’s Company of Alabama Volunteers” (this company later mustered as Company H, 37th Alabama Volunteer Infantry CSA); Enlisted for “three years or the war” and recruited by Capt. Marion C.J. Searcy; Present with the regiment and WIA on an unknown date during siege of Vicksburg MS (18 May – 4 July 1863), and signed his parole there in City Hospital on 13 July 1863 as a Private of Company H of the 37th AL Infantry CSA; Appears on a list of prisoners killed and wounded at Vicksburg with notation: “Wounded slightly” and dated 18 Sept 1863 at Enterprise MS; Appears on an undated list of prisoners from Vicksburg aboard the U.S. Steamer H. Choteau then en route from Vicksburg MS to Mobile AL via New Orleans LA; Appears as one of 181 enlisted men and 21 officers (POWs) delivered back into Confederate hands at Fort Morgan AL (located at the mouth of Mobile Bay AL) aboard the U.S. Steamer Suffolk, arriving at Fort Morgan 11 Aug 1863; Still in service in early 1864 as he signed receipts for clothing issued during Feb., March, and as late as 14 April 1864, most likely at Dalton GA winter encampment (although location not specified on receipts); Born 25 Feb 1827 at Barnesville District, SC; Buried in First Baptist Church (Old Mt. Liberty) Cem., County Road 1, Level Plains, Ala. marker reportedly inscribed: "Sexton, George W. Co H 37th Ala.Inf."


Shadrick, Harrison
Private
Company E

Age at Enlistment: 22
Enlisted 19 Apr 1862 at Auburn (also Columbia); POW at Iuka MS and died there of gunshot wound to arm on 5 Oct 1862; Claim for deceased soldier filed 16 Feb 1863 by Francis J. Shadrack, widow

Shank, Henry M
Private-2nd Corporal
Company D, E & I

Age at Enlistment: 24
Enlisted 21 Apr 1862; Appears on Muster Roll of Company D dated 13 May 1862 at Auburn AL as Private; POW at Iuka-Corinth-Hatchie; Served as 2nd Corporal in Co. E; Reportedly ate a stray dog during Vicksburg siege and signed his parole at Vicksburg MS on 10 July 1863; Hospitalized in Ross Hospital at Mobile AL 28 Sep-7 Oct 1864 with Febris Intermittens, Quot. (malaria); Paroled at Greensboro NC 1 May 1865 as part of CONSOLIDATED 37th AL CSA Co. D

Sharp, J A
Private
Company A

Enlisted 9 Sep 1861 in Company G of 54th AL CSA; Paroled in the field at Vicksburg MS as a Private of Co. G of the 54th AL CSA; paroled at Greensboro NC 1 May 1865 as part of CONSOLIDATED 37th AL CSA Co. A

Sharp, Warren J
Private-Corporal
Company D

Age at Enlistment: 32
Enlisted 7 Apr 1862 at Auburn AL; Appears on Muster Roll of Company D dated 13 May 1862 at Auburn AL; Signed his parole at Vicksburg MS 10 July 1863; KIA at Atlanta GA 22 July 1864

Sharpin (Sharin/Shipman), John
Private
Company H

Enlisted 5 May 1862 in Company B of 42nd AL CSA; Paroled at Greensboro NC 1 May 1865 as John "Sharpin" as part of CONSOLIDATED 37th AL CSA Co. H

Shaver, J W
Private
Company G

No additional information currently available

Shaver, John F
Private
Company I

Signed his parole at Vicksburg MS on 10 July 1863; Hospitalized in Ross Hospital at Mobile AL 17-24 Oct 1864 with Febris Intermittens, Tert. (malaria); Paroled at Augusta GA 18 Aug 1865

Shaver, John T
Private
Company I

Died in service of wounds received on unknown date during siege of Vicksburg MS (8 May-4 July 1863 or shortly thereafter); Appears on Muster Roll of "Company ’I’ 37th Regiment, Alabama Volunteers at LaFayette, Chambers County, Alabama, March 6, 1862" published in 31 July 1901 issue of LAFAYETTE SUN (LaFayette, Chambers Co AL) as "Shaver, John T., died at Vicksburg (MS) of wounds" - POSSIBLE THAT THIS RECORD WAS INTENDED FOR WILLIAM W. SHAVER/ALSO OF COMPANY I WHO DID DIE OF WOUNDS AT VICKSBURG AND WHO IS NOT LISTED ON SAME MUSTER ROLL. RECORDS FOR JOHN SHAVER/COMPANY I SHOW A MAN OF THAT NAME SURVIVING INTO 1864, AT LEAST


Shaver, Wiley Booker
Private-3rd Corporal
Company E & G

Enlisted 10 May 1862 in Company E of 37th AL CSA; Hospitalized in General Hospital at Marion MS 30 June 1862; Hospitalized in Ross Hospital at Mobile AL 19-26 Sep 1864 with Febris Remittens (malaria); Paroled at Greensboro NC 1 May 1865 as part of CONSOLIDATED 37th AL CSA Co. G; Witnessed the Confederate Pension application of widow of John W. Blakely (Co. G) along with W.M. Blakely (Co. G); Appears incorrectly as "Wiley B Slaver" on Muster Roll of Company G published in 19 June 1902 edition of The Weekly Enterprise (Enterprise AL); Mentioned in S.L. Burney's Letter to the Editor of The LaFayette Sun  (LaFayette, Chambers Co, AL) dated 4 July 1906 as living at Chambers Co. AL; Buried in Rock Springs Baptist Church Cemetery, marker: "Wiley B. Shaver, Co. G, 37th ALA" with dates 8 Apr 1848-2 Mar 1918: His obituary, courtesy of Glenda Brack, from the March 8, 1916 issue of The LaFayette Sun  (LaFayette, Alabama):

Death Of An Old Citizen.
            Mr. Wiley Booker Shaver died at his residence in the Rock Spring neighborhood on Wednesday of last week. He was born on April 8, 1843; was married to Miss Nancy Katherine House Dec. 1866, who survives him, together with two sons and five daughters – Messrs. J. T. and J. P. Shaver, Jr., Mrs. W. D. Slaughter, Mrs. J. C. Slaughter, Mrs. F. H. Callahan and Misses Janie and Mattie Shaver. Mr. Shaver was an exemplary Christian; he joined the Rock Spring Baptist Church in 1876 and was baptized by Rev. R. A. J. Cumbee. Besides his immediate family, he left a large number of grandchildren and many friends who esteemed him for his many good qualities. The funeral was held at Rock Spring and was conducted by the pastor, Rev. A. C. Yeargan, assisted by Dr. W. C. Bledsoe, an old former pastor, in the presence of a large company of relatives and friends. Mr. Shaver had suffered long from a lingering illness, which was borne with Christian fortitude and patience.

(Per
“Survey of Cemeteries in Chambers County, Alabama” there is a tombstone in the Rock Springs Baptist Church Cemetery that reads: “W. B. Shaver, April 18, 1843 – Mar. 2, 1916, Co. G, 37th Alabama Infantry, C.S.A.” He is buried with and close to members of his family. – Glenda Brack)


Shaver (sic Sharer), William W
Private
Company I

Age: 30 in 1863
Enlisted 26 Apr 1862 at Lafayette AL; WIA or sick as he signed his parole at Vicksburg MS with X while in S&W General Hospital #2 on 10 July 1863 as a Private of Company I of the 37th AL Infantry CSA; Died in service 21 July 1863 likely of wounds or disease from Vicksburg MS; Claim for deceased soldier filed by Sophia Shaver, widow, but was canceled with amount due of $135.94 including $50 bounty; 5’8" tall with red complexion, blue eyes, red hair and farmer by occupation; Born in Edgefield District SC and age 30 at death

Shaw, William F
Private
Company A

Age at Enlistment: 29
Enlisted 30 Apr 1862 at Auburn AL by J.F. Dowdell; Listed as Private on Muster Roll of Company A dated 13 May 1862 at Auburn AL

Shealy (Shealey), George Washington
1st Lieutenant-Captain
Company E & G

Enlisted 24 March 1862 at Cusseta in Company E of 37th AL CSA; Signed his parole at Vicksburg MS 10 July 1863 as Private; Mentioned as being present at Demopolis AL parole camp in memoir of S.L. Burney circa 1916; Served as Videt picket at Missionary Ridge TN 25 Nov 1863; 2 Lt to 1 Lt of Co. G; Transferred as Capt to Co. G; Signed many pay records and other requests for company; Paroled at Greensboro NC 1 May 1865 as part of CONSOLIDATED 37th AL CSA Co. G as Captain; Witnessed the Confederate Pension application of W.J. Havis (Co. E); Mentioned in S.L. Burney's Letter to the Editor of LAFAYETTE SUN (LaFayette, Chambers Co, AL) dated 4 July 1906 as living at West Point (GA); Died 3 June 1920 and buried at Pinewood Cem., West Point GA

Shellhouse, Samson
Private
Company A

Age at Enlistment: 19
Enlisted 14 Apr 1862 at Dale AL by H.E. Owens; Listed as Private on Muster Roll of Company A dated 13 May 1862 at Auburn AL; Paid commutation of rations for $156.13 on 28 Feb 1864 and for service in Nov and Dec 1863

Shelly (Shealy/Shealey?), W E
Private
Company G

Hospitalized in Ross Hospital at Mobile AL 5-6 Oct 1864 with Febris Intermittens, Tert. (malaria)

Shields, J F
Private
Company F

Age at Enlistment: 23
Enlisted 12 March 1862 at China Grove, Pike County AL; Hospitalized in General Hospital at Marion MS 31 Aug 1862 and returned to duty 15 Jan 1863; Signed his parole at Vicksburg MS on 10 July 1863; PROBABLY SAME MAN AS "J T SHIELDS" ALSO OF CO. F

Shields, J T
Private
Company F

PROBABLY SAME MAN AS "J F SHIELDS" ALSO OF CO. F

Shields, James W
Private
Company D

Age at Enlistment: 24
Enlisted 9 Apr 1862 at Auburn AL; Appears on Muster Roll of Company D dated 13 May 1862 at Auburn AL; Listed as Private in muster roll of Co. D published by T.J. Carlisle in 1902 WEEKLY ENTERPRISE (Enterprise AL)

Shields, Robert G (W)
Private
Company D

Age at Enlistment: 18
Enlisted 9 Apr 1862 at Auburn AL; Appears on Muster Roll of Company D dated 13 May 1862 at Auburn AL; Listed as Private in muster roll of Co. D published by T.J. Carlisle in 1902 WEEKLY ENTERPRISE (Enterprsie AL)

Shields, William H
Private
Company D

Age at Enlistment: 22
Enlisted 9 Apr 1862 at Auburn AL; Appears on Muster Roll of Company D dated 13 May 1862 at Auburn AL; Listed as Private in muster roll of Co. D published by T.J. Carlisle in 1902 WEEKLY ENTERPRISE (Enterprise AL)

Ship (Shipps), L G (L S)
Private
Company F

Age at Enlistment: 38
Enlisted 12 March 1862 at Pike County AL; Signed his parole at Vicksburg MS on 10 July 1863; Hospitalized in Fair Grounds Hospital No. 2 outside Atlanta GA on 25 Feb 1864 and transferred to Forsythe Hospital at Forsythe GA (no date), and returned to duty 16 March 1864; Paroled at Montgomery AL 26 May 1865; Described as 5’6" tall with dark hair, gray eyes and dark complexion

Shipp (Shipes), Nathan
Private
Company B & H

Enlisted 18 March 1862 at Lawrenceville AL in Company B of 37th AL CSA; Paroled at Greensboro NC, 1 May 1865 as part of CONSOLIDATED 37th AL CSA Co. H

Shockley (Schockley), William D
Private
Company D

Age at Enlistment: 25
Enlisted 9 Apr 1862 at Auburn AL; Appears on Muster Roll of Company D dated 13 May 1862 at Auburn AL; Paid 5 March 1863 commutation of rations at 25 cents per day for 8 days

Shropshire, John W
Private
Company D

Age at Enlistment: 33
Enlisted 9 Apr 1862 at Auburn AL; Appears on Muster Roll of Company D dated 13 May 1862 at Auburn AL

Simmons, J D
Private
Company A

Enlisted (Conscripted?) 3 Apr 1864; Paroled at Greensboro NC 1 May 1865 as part of CONSOLIDATED 37th AL CSA Company A

Simmons, Newton
Private
Company I

Died in service of unknown cause at Vicksburg MS 4 June 1863; Buried in unknown grave in Soldiers Rest plot of Cedar Hill (City) Cemetery, Vicksburg MS

Simpler (Sampler), William A
Private
Company K

Age at Enlistment: abt 14
Signed his parole at Vicksburg MS on 9 July 1863; POW at Missionary Ridge TN 25 Nov 1863 and sent to Nashville, Louisville and on to Rock Island Prison IL; ALSO (CONFLICTING DATA) Hospitalized in General Field Hospital (USA) at Bridgeport AL 10 Dec 1863 with Intermittent Fever as "Taken prisoner at battle of Ringgold, GA"; Took Oath of Allegiance 17 June 1865 at Rock Island Prison IL; 5’10" tall with gray eyes, auburn hair and fresh complexion; Age at taking of Oath 20; Residence: Melo (Milo?), Pike County AL; Marker for "W.A. Simpler, Private, Co. K, 37th Alabama Infantry" 17 Dec 1848-10 Jan 1891 located in Antioch Primative Baptist Church Cemetery (near Crenshaw County Line) in Coffee County AL; Possibly closely related to "Sunpler," William also of Company K who has conflicting data as POW – this could help explain conflict by having second man of same name with combined records and since one is so young at Vicksburg parole - only about 15

Simpson, Charles K (R)
Private
Company B

Enlisted 15 March 1862 at Daviston AL; Born 4 Sep 1840 - Died 23 June 1883 and buried at Bethlehem Cem., Bethlehem, Tallapoosa Co., AL

Simpson, John L. H.
Private
Company G

Signed his parole at Vicksburg MS on 9 July 1863

Sims, A J
Rank Unknown
Company E

Born 23 Aug 1846 - Died 11 June 1894 and buried in City Cem., Camp Hill, Tallapoosa Co., AL
 
Sims Ignatious N (J M)
Private
Company H

Enlisted 9 May 1862 in Company G of 42nd AL CSA; Paroled in the field at Vicksburg MS as a Private of company G of the 42nd AL CSA; Paroled at Greensboro NC 1 May 1865 as part of Consolidated 37th AL CSA Company H

Sims, Seth
Private
Company C

Died in service, possibly KIA at Corinth MS 3-5 Oct 1862 or died of wounds from Iuka-Corinth-Hatchie, or of disease; Listed as "Confederate soldier forwarded to Columbus, KY from Corinth, MS October 9, 1862. Dead."; Claim for deceased soldier filed 31 Oct 1864 by Mahala Simes, widow; Brother to William Sims (Co C); Brother-in-Law to Chelsey W. and James H. Bozeman (both Co C); According to family sources born 1823 in AL to William and Anna Sims

Sims, William Elvin (C.)
Private
Company C

The name "Sims, William C." (more likely to actually be "Sims, William" of Company "C" - not a middle initial) appears on a register of "Officers and Soldiers of the Army of the Confederate States who were killed in battle or who died of wounds or disease" at Iuka MS dated 19 Sept 1862. Elizabeth Sims, widow of William Elvin Sims, received Alabama Confederate Pension No.  29612 at Covington Co AL stating that her husband died 19 Sep 1862 which date is consistent with being Killed in Action (KIA) at Iuka MS and matches date of death of Sims, Wm "C"; Widow's pension witnessed by C.W. Bozeman (also Co C and former brother-in-law to late Seth Sims) and W.F. Hudson (Co C); Brother to Seth Sims (Co C); According to family sources born 1830 to William and Anna Sims

Singer, Abraham (Abram)
Private
Company I

Enlisted 6 March 1862 at Lafayette AL; Signed his parole at Vicksburg MS on 9 July 1863; KIA at Missionary Ridge TN 25 Nov 1863; Claim for deceased soldier filed 28 Jan 1864 by Maria Singer, widow; Appears on Muster Roll of "Company 'I' 37th Regiment, Alabama Volunteers at LaFayette, Chambers County, Alabama, March 6, 1862" published in 31 July 1901 issue of LAFAYETTE SUN (LaFayette, Chambers County AL) with Privates as "Singer, Abram, killed at Missionary Ridge, Nov. 25, 1863"; Presumably buried at/near Chattanooga TN


Singletary (sic Singleton), Samuel Marion (L) ("Tuck"/"Tup")
Private-2nd Sergeant
Company A & H

Age at Enlistment: 19
Enlisted 22 March 1862 at Auburn AL by J F Dowdell; Listed as Private on Muster Roll of Company A dated 13 May 1862 at Auburn AL; Served as Ordnance Sergeant; Signed his parole in the field at Vicksburg MS on 9 July 1863 as a Private of Co. A of the 37th AL Infantry CSA; Paroled at Greensboro NC as part of CONSOLIDATED 37th AL CSA Co. A as 2nd Sergeant; Born 1843; Wrote an extensive letter to the editor of his recollections of the formation of Co. A and of the Battle of Iuka MS on 19-20 Sep 1862 published in the 17 April 1902 and the 8 May 1902 editions of WEEKLY ENTERPRISE (Enterprise, Chambers Co, AL) which follow (a third account was also apparently written as it is mentioned by Carlisle, but to date, a copy has not been available – it may or may not have been published in the WEEKLY ENTERPRISE); Excerpt from 17 April 1902 WEEKLY ENTERPRISE:

"Formation of the "Henry Volunteers" Which Became Co. A, of the 37th Ala. Reg’t. at its Organization. / Early in the second week of March 1862, Moses B Green, W E Bradley, Robert L Phipps, J V Perryman and Dr James M Saunders began to enlist men for the company. Green and Bradley worked in Abbeville and west into Dale county getting the larger part of men in that locality. Phipps and Perryman recruited in the eastern portion of the county and Dr James Saunders and Thomas Armstrong worked in the lower end of the county, getting the second largest batch of recruits. On Saturday preceding the 18th of March they had their first meeting to decide when we should leave and the 18th agreed upon. There was no other business of importance transacted at this meeting. / The 18th was ushered in amid torrents of rain but this did not retard us for a moment. We had to travel by private conveyance to Fort Gaines which is fourteen miles away. The trip was made through the rain and the hardest I have ever seen fall. Every rivulet and gulley was full to overflowing. Finally we reached Franklin, which is on the west side of the Chattahoochie, opposite Fort Gaines. The bridge across the river had washed away and we had to cross on a flat. I went across with the first batch of men on the first trip that flat made, as we had to wait for it to be launched. When about midway the stream the flat dipped water and the men became uneasy and began to move around quite lively and no doubt would have sunk the flat had it not been for J V Perryman, who was an experienced ferryman and who reassured the boys; and we landed on the east bank of the river amid torrents of rain, and the river the fullest I had ever seen it. / Some of the relatives who went along to see their boys off would not risk recrossing at the Fort but went to Eufaula to cross on the bridge, which is twenty-five miles north of the Fort. Fort Gaines is situated on the east side of the river on a high bluff which we had to climb on our way to the old College which was to be our camp for the night. I and Joseph M Murphy made the trip up this hill together, and when about half way up he lost his footing and rolled off down the hill at the same time remarking, "We are in it, Sam are we not!" I told him it looked like he was. We reached the old college which was a large old building very much dilapidated, with the glass all broken out of the windows by the smart boys of that time. The railing around the gallery had been torn away and a man by the name of Mills who was on his way to Pensacola, walked off and fell about twelve feet to the hard floor below which disabled him for the balance of the war. But I have learned that he recovered soon after the war closed, thanks. / After supper it was announced that we would to into the elections of company officers and M B Green and W E Bradley were put in nomination for Captain. {illegible word/torn section} Bradley declined because Green had been most instrumental in raising the company and he was elected without opposition. Bradley and R L Phipps were candidates for first Lieutenant. Phipps beat Bradley a few votes and was declared elected. Bradley then declared himself for second Lieutenant and was elected. Then the friends of J V Perryman and Dr Jesse Bruner put their names in nomination and Perryman was elected by a small majority. Dr Bruner then declined to go with the company and returned home. It was then announced that we would elect an Orderly Sergeant and J M Murphy was put in nomination and elected without opposition. This completed the organization of the company except the appointment of non-commissioned officers, which the captain did soon after our arrival at Auburn which was as follows: Henry A Youge, 2d Sergt; Thomas O Knight, 3d Sergt; George W Bruner, 4th Sergt; W E Saunders, 5th Sergt; James D Murphy, 1st corporal; James W Vaughn, 2d corporal; John B Buxton, 3d corporal; James M Gray, 4th corporal. / After the election was over in the old college the boys pitched in to paint things red about the old building, for it rained so hard till they could not get out to paint the fort. The old men who went over to see the boys off whiled away the night in games of poker. Some of the boys tried to sleep but could not from the strangeness of the situation and the bad ones that were in the crowd. I don’t think I spent another night that served me so bad during the war; it being my first experience, it went hard with me. / Early on the morning of the 19th we were up and in the fort seeing things as they existed there. About ten o’clock we bid our relatives and friends adieu and boarded the train and were soon on our way to Fort Valley where we had to change cars for the west. There was but one incident that occurred on that day that is worth relating aside from some bad wash-outs which delayed us for sometime. / Capt Greene got off the train at one of the little stations and loitered around there till the train pulled out and left him. My attention being called to it, I looked down the road and saw the old fellow in a trot following us about a quarter behind. The train stopped and he came aboard and was with us to the end of the journey. / We arrived at Fort Valley late in the afternoon and had to lie over till four o’clock in the morning and wait for a train westbound. Consequently we had to camp and having no tents we had to occupy porches and plazas, and I being a sonambulist, especially when my usual rest had been broken, was surprised to be abruptly awakened with my mouth full of mud. I had got up and walked across the railroad and run into an embankment, and I lost no time in getting back to my quarters. / The train arrived on time from Macon and we boarded her and went to Columbus, where we arrived at about sun-up. The good people of that town had been apprised of our coming and had prepared to give us breakfast which was a treat to us as we had eaten nothing since the morning of the nineteenth. After breakfast it was learned that we would not leave for a couple of hours so some of the boys went on a lark down town and some weeks later they suffered for their folly. Finally we boarded the train and went to Auburn where we arrived in the afternoon and quartered in the old academy, the citizens feeding us till the 22d when we were mustered into service and drew tents and camp equipage, and moved out south of town to camp of instruction. / This brings up the organization of the Regiment and I will leave that to be told by some one that is better prepared than I am. / Samuel M. Singletary, / Ord. Sergt Co A, 37th Ala Reg. / March 7, 1902" ;

Another letter published in "WEEKLY ENTERPRISE. VOL. 4. ENTERPRISE, ALABAMA, THURSDAY, MAY 8, 1902:

37th Ala. In Battle of Iuka. / On Monday the 11th day of September, we broke camp at Baldwin, Miss, and marched to Iuka, a distance of fifty miles where we arrived the 14th, the enemy retiring on our approach. We rested in the enemy’s camp that evening and night, and on the 15th we were put in line of battle some two or three miles west of town where we remained until about two hours by sun on the 19th, when we were ordered back toward town; and the boys thinking they had been fooled on purpose began to guy Gen Price and other officers who happened to be near. But this fun was destined to last but a short time as there was business just ahead. When we arrived in sight of Iuka we took a road leading in a southwesterly direction which we moved along for a mile at a double-quick, when the big dogs began to bark and the shells pass over and some of the boys made remarks about buzzards passing, it being their first experience with shells. We filed left and moved far enough to pass to the left of those engaged, fronted, and moved to the front ourselves. Almost at the first volley, Henry Miller fell dead pierced with a minie ball, and Floyd Nall mortally wounded, who died during the night. We moved to the front till we came into line with those engaged on our right, where we fought them till dusk and some on e ordered us to change and we went right into their line. A Yanky Major being the first to see our approach shot a man by the name of Judkins through the arm with his pistol. By this time five or six of us had our muskets on him and were pressing our triggers when he threw up his hands and said "for God’s sake don’t fire, men," which saved his life. His pistol was taken from him and he was turned over to Judkins to escort him to the rear as a prisoner of war. Some of the boys who were slightly wounded and on their way to the hospital reported that they saws Judkins sitting by a tree with the Major between his legs punching him in the sides with the pistol and swearing that he was of a good will to kill him, the Major begging for his life. / Judkins was a member of Co D, and I don’t think he was ever with his company any more. / W J Banister, of our company was killed in the last charge. / Capt M B Green and W R Kelly were badly hurt by Major Slaton’s runaway horse. / We held the battle ground during the night and lay among the dead and dying Yankies. It was heart-rending to hear them call for their doctors, captains and friends, and as the night wore on they gradually ceased. Some dying, others being carried to the hospital. I never smell bruised leaves but that my mind goes back to Iuka. The smell of the leaves, powder and blood made me so sick till I had to vomit. / Just before day on the morning of the 20th we were called into line and began the retreat. Our route lay through Iuka and when we reached that place we were delayed for sometime, and the federal artillery appeared on a high hill south of us, unlimbered and the ominous puff of white smoke told us what was coming long before the shells passed over our heads. They fired three or four shots but we did not remain a target for them, for somehow or other our legs got in double quick action and took us away from there. / In crossing the creek made by the Iuka springs, I could see the bottom, dry, about as often as otherwise for the boys in their hurry to get away from the shells had about knocked all the water out of it. / We made our way back to Baldwin on the Mobile & Ohio railroad without being engaged though there was fighting by the rear guard several days. We arrived at Baldwin on the 23d and rested the 24th preparatory to the march to Corinth, which I will describe the best I can in my next letter. / S M Singletary." ;

Mentioned in letter from the editor -- T.J. Carlisle -- in May 15, 1902 edition of WEEKLY ENTERPRISE:

"... I have just received the organization of Company A, written by Sergt S M Singletary (known as Tup Singletary)...";

Mentioned by T.J. Carlisle in the 22 May 1902 edition of WEEKLY ENTERPRISE editorial:

"... Sergt A J Bryant, Co K, has written two communications; Sergt S M Singletary, Co A, three; David Majors, Co C, two; W W Still, Co I, one; and D M Spence, Co I, one...";

Witnessed the Confederate Pension application of Joseph J. Clarke (Co. H); Witnessed the Confederate Pension application of J.W. Cook (Co. A); Witnessed the Confederate Pension application of Albert S. Davis (Cos. A & H); Witnessed the Confederate Pension application of Caroline Harris, widow of Carey Harris (Co. A); Witnessed the Confederate Pension application of E.C. Holton (Co. A)



Singletary (Singleterry), James M (W)
Private
Company E

Age at Enlistment: 18
Enlisted 19 Apr 1862 at Columbia AL; Died in service of unknown cause at Vicksburg MS 19 May 1863; Buried in Grave 1105 of Soldiers Rest plot of Cedar Hill (City) Cemetery, Vicksburg MS

Singleton, Flavius (Flevous) G
Private
Company E

Age at Enlistment: 18 (24)
POW at Iuka-Corinth-Hatchie on list dated at Corinth MS 13 Oct 1862; KIA at Vicksburg MS 22 May 1863; Buried in unknown grave in Soldiers Rest plot of Cedar Hill (City) Cemetery, Vicksburg MS; also "24" at enlistment

Singleton, Thomas G
Private
Company E

Died in service of unknown cause at unknown location/date; Claim for deceased soldier filed 24 March 1864 by Martha C. Singleton, widow

Singleton, W
Private
Company H

Paroled at Talladega AL 30 May 1865 by General Chrysler’s troops

Skinner, A
Private
Company A

Enlisted 29 Oct 1864 (also 24 Oct); Paroled at Greensboro NC 1 May 1865 as part of CONSOLIDATED 37th AL CSA Co. A

Skinner, J P
Private
Company A

Enlisted (Conscripted?) 27 Jan 1865 (also 26 Jan); Paroled at Greensboro NC 1 May 1865 as part of CONSOLIDATED 37th AL CSA Co. A

Skinner, Thomas
Private
Company E

Age at Enlistment: 45
Enlisted 7 Apr 1862 at Auburn AL; Hospitalized at Marion MS on 1 Apr 1862; Furloughed on 11 Dec 1863 for 40 days but never returned to service; Died in service as claim for deceased soldier filed 8 Sep 1863 by W.E. Skinner (Dates do not match - either furlough or claim year is apparently incorrect)

Skipper, Jacob (James) L
Captain
Company E

Age at Enlistment: 26
Enlisted 29 March 1862 at Woodville AL; Elected Captain same date as enlistment; Resigned 12 Oct 1863 and resignation accepted 11 Nov 1863; Succeeded as Captain by Joel G. Greene on 11 Nov 1863; 2. Resigned for medical reasons, Dr Oslin noted he had suffered from "...chronic diarrhea for 10 to 12 months and partial paralysis of left thigh and has not improved with 12 months of treatment..."; Signed many requisitions, including one for a coffin for Robert Brown, Pvt. Company E, at Columbus MS on 20 July 1862; Buried in Dothan City Cemetery, Houston County AL, marker inscribed "Jacob L. Skipper Capt. Co. E., 37th Alabama Inf." b/ Nov 13 1835 d/ Sept 15 1904

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37th Alabama Regiment of Volunteer Infantry CSA
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